Saturday, March 15, 2008

Catholics in Science Symposium at UD: Prof. Dermott Mullan & the stars!


Why I Am an Astronomer and a Catholic

by Professor Dermott Mullan
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware

On Monday, March 17, 2008 at 205 Hall, University of Delaware, Professor Dermott Mullan will continue the Catholics in Science Symposium with a talk that reflects on life as a working astronomer and a practicing Catholic, two identities which in some people's minds appear mutually exclusive.

This talk is free and open to all. It runs from 7-9pm. Refreshments will be served.

Hasn't modern astronomy proved that the account of the beginnings of our world in the Book of Genesis must be wrong? And hasn't the Catholic Church been opposed to science since the days of Galileo?

In his career as an astronomer, Professor Dermott Mullan has learned that the answer to both questions is a resounding "No." The God of the Astronomers is the same God Dr. Mullan has met in the Catholic Church and in the Bible.

The notion that science and faith are in conflict is a commonplace these days. But is it so?

Come to Dr. Mullan's talk and prepare to hear that truism challenged and turned on its head.

For additional information, contact Kate Rogers at 302-831-8480 or krogers@udel.edu. This event is sponsored by Students of Western Civilization, Catholic Scholars of Delaware, and the Catholic Campus Ministry! # # #

But wait! There's more! Join us for
  • Why I am a Medical Technologist and a Catholic, Dr. Mary Ann McLane, March 24, 7-9 pm at 205 Gore Hall
  • Modern Physics and Ancient Faith, Dr. Stephen Barr, April 14, 7-9pm at 205 Gore Hall.

Tuesday, March 04, 2008

Michael Tkacz to speak at University of Delaware


Thank God for Science: How Medieval Churchmen Gave Us the Experimental Method

On Monday, March 10, 2008 at 115 Purnell Hall, University of Delaware, Professor Michael W. Tkacz will kick off the Catholics in Science Symposium with a talk that explodes the misconception that science and the Christian Church are at odds. Dr. Tkacz is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Gonzaga University.

This talk is free and open to all. It runs from 7-9pm. Refreshments will be served.

Science and Christianity have always been at war, right?

Wrong! Scholastic philosophers of the medieval universities originated the mathematical & experimental methods associated with modern science.

Modern science arose out of the rejection of scholasticism & medieval Christian culture, correct?

Wrong again!

The historical evidence supports a very different view of the origins of scientific research. The Christian theologians & natural philosophers of the early universities initiated the historically continuous tradition of scientific investigation that continues today.

Only when the bonds of authoritarian religion were loosed was the free-thinking necessary for scientific progress possible Surely that truism is correct?

Wrong, wrong, wrong!

The contributions of churchmen are so significant that one may rightly say that the scientific revolution took place, not in the seventeenth century—the time of Galileo—as commonly thought, but in the thirteenth century—the time of Thomas Aquinas.

A look at some of the experimental efforts of medieval thinkers will reveal a forgotten early chapter in the history of science. It will also reveal the close association of the Christian faith & the scientific spirit.

For additional information, contact Kate Rogers at 302-831-8480 or krogers@udel.edu. This event is sponsored by the Department of Philosophy, Students of Western Civilization, and the Catholic Scholars of Delaware. # # #